Wednesday, 30 November 2016

Where When How Wednesday - KarenR

Welcome to 'Where When How Wednesday'. In these weekly posts I'll be interviewing creatives about their journey into the creative world, their works, and what makes them tick. This week I'm interviewing KarenR, a talented model based in Manchester.



Hi Karen, thanks for taking the time to answer a few questions for me. We should probably start at the beginning...when and how did you come about getting into the world of modelling?

'I began modelling from an early age - seriously. I should explain that you cannot really survive in my family without having a unique job. I come from quite a creative background. Most of the male members of my family work in Rugby League, where as the females... well my mother was a country singer and my sister is a magician (yes) so it made sense that I eventually had to follow suit and choose a slightly less than average job to your 9 to 5 lark!

I decided to "revisit" modelling after a spell running a larger ladies clothing store in the Trafford Centre, as well as a pub and several go's at living life in the magaluf club scene and a failed relationship with an ex Scottish first division footballer - I eventually thought I had to lead a fairly normal life and just go for it! So I came home and joined these modelling network sites...and Ive never looked back. Ive always been lucky and not so much encouraged, but its always been a thing in our family that you may as well have a go at doing something you love.'


Most things, especially online, tend to fall into specific genres and/or gets described as being a specific style. The trouble with this is it's quite subjective, the style someone views something to be can often differ to the style the person creating it views it as. How would you describe the work you are putting out there?

'This is where the interview answers will no doubt become slightly different to the usual that you read about. You see I like to be different, and in all honesty I cant claim to have a certain style that I like to shoot. Nor do I draw inspiration from anywhere.

I would say that the genre of nude is my preferred style as I love the way you can create something beautiful using just your body. However I am totally happy shooting anything. It amazes me how I can go into a shoot with ideas in my mind and come out with images that are totally different, but have worked better. This used to happen quite a lot but now Ive learnt not to think about ideas too much.

I am also quite free with my movements and I am fairly relaxed about creating images where my lower regions are on show. That's not to say that I am happy shooting high levels, I have my set levels. I also have written on my profile that I am happy creating images where I am on show, as long as the image has merit. This is probably where most people would get confused when describing the style of a certain image and the debate of is it adult or isn't it starts...for me its more a matter of does the image look good?'

Photographer - Graham Martin


Photography, modelling and their related skills, as with most things, can have their share of problems. I personally have a particular problem with self confidence. This confidence issue can and has caused me issues with my photography. Do you find any aspects of modelling particularly challenging?

'For me, I cannot think of a challenging issue that I have to face as a model. I honestly cant. I pride myself on being able to work with anyone whether they are newbies and face confidence issues, or whether they are professional full timers with abundance of ideas. I have heard of some models needing time on a shoot before working to nude, even this is something I haven't experienced. Even on a group shoot with 20 photographers staring at me didn't faze me. Modelling to me is the easiest job I have ever had to do and that's a fact. The only challenging aspect arises from the part leading up to a shoot. We have all heard about models going quiet and failing to make contact with the photographer - well let me tell you it isn't just a one way street. I have lost count of the amount of photographers who have disappeared the day before a planned shoot. But this doesn't bother me too much - it should but I'm lucky, I'm married and my husband works full time so Im not really dependant on the wage of that particular shoot. Of course I will moan about this - so anyone who has just read that and thinks im an easy touch let me tell you, I have a amazing memory. I will never forget.

The only other slightly annoying thing is when you know you're perfect for a shoot that a particular photographer is casting for, so you apply only to hear nothing. Ok this happens regularly and that isn't the issue here, it's then the fact that that same photographer has liked most of your images, added you to a list explaining that he would like to work with you, but then openly moans that not one model has applied to his casting. Yes those photographers really get my goat - Yes they are out there. But its part of the learning curve of the modelling world.'

Photographer - Graham Martin


In my series 'Foto Inspiration Friday' I share the people, images, places etc that I find give me inspiration. Who, or what, or where do you draw inspiration from?

'As previously mentioned, I don't really draw on anyone in particular for inspiration. Its probably wrong of me to say that, and I do admire many people's work, but I cannot say I have ever been really enthused with the need to create something in that style. I like experimenting. I like thinking outside of the box when on a shoot, however I don't intentionally arrive on a shoot with the need to create a particular style. There have been occasions when I have liked several images and have wanted to recreate them myself, always with a slightly different spin to it. Its true I am a complete blank canvas.

Another difficult part to modelling for me, which I could have mentioned in the above question but again its not a major issue, is when a photographer when planning a shoot will ask me whether I have any ideas I want to shoot. That's a little difficult for me as I don't usually get ideas until Ive seen and set the scene. I cant plan ahead I just have to do it! I enjoy participating in day shoots at mansions and abandoned places, most recently Standon Hall and Newsham Park. I was lucky enough to be joined by a photographer who thinks like me. The way we played it was that we went with no ideas whatsoever. Once there we had a 30 minute walk around and collected the ideas that way. You then get creative with whatever resources you have brought with you and it works for us. I find that planning in advance - naming what items you are going to bring and preparing a mood board just builds expectations and time. You are either frustrated that you haven't captured the idea you had the way you wanted to, or you've spent 3 hours getting 1 shot perfect where I have just created 30 equally as good images in that time. But that's just me.'

Photographer - Dave.S


Sometimes images hold a special significance to us. It can be the first image we ever made, it can be an image drawing attention to a cause close to our hearts, it can simply be an image of someone we love. Do you have an image or images that hold a special significance to you?

'Modelling wise, the image that stands out to me in my portfolio is the one I use as a cover on purpleport. The flour throwing shoot. It gets commented on quite a lot. I know now that flour shoots have been ever as so popular and are forever popping up, because its a great idea and creation no matter how you shoot it, but this one will always remind me that it was February and felt like -2 (which is probably was) and we created it outside in pitch darkness. I also have some images that are not necessarily the best shot in some people's eyes, however I keep them on my portfolio to remind me of what a great shoot and day it was. In fact I tend to only use images that I truly love on my portfolio. I don't upload great masses of images at once. I tend just to upload one at a time - just to always keep my portfolio fresh and updated.'

Studio - Hampson St Studio


Photoshoots can sometimes leave you open to scary or funny situations. What's the scariest or funniest situation you've found yourself in on a shoot?

'I have had a lot of strange scenarios on shoots - I will write a best selling book one day! From photographers dying on me (not literally on me) but the day after our shoot to a photographer falling off a cliff during a photoshoot - honestly! He made a complete recovery too!

A personal funny one that we all laugh about happened to take place after a Friday 13th Horror themed shoot. I was in costume, complete with fake blood, plastic knives you name it... I declined a shower at the studio after the shoot had finished as I lived only 15 minutes away. But the worst happened... yep I broke down on the way home and had to ring the RAC out. The RAC man's face was a picture especially when he opened the boot to find my spare wheel and the knives still covered in blood fell out.

In the beginning when I carried a portfolio around with me, I once caught the gas man who had come to fix the boiler having a good nosey through my album. Lesson learnt was not to leave it on the kitchen table near to where he was working, and not to leave it open on the page showing my nude work. That was a red faced moment.'

Photographer - Graham Martin


We've talked about your start, we've talked about your current work, let's quickly chat about the future. What have you got coming up this year, more of the same? Any special projects? Plus in regards to a more long term plan, where are you hoping your creative journey will take you in the years to come?

'As this year seems to be flying by already Im glad I haven't really had any set plans that I have aimed to complete as I wouldn't have done them. Its not that I don't have any ambitions, I just don't have many expectations. I like to plod along and that way I get a steady stream of income and I enjoy doing what im doing constantly. It would be great to tour more, however responsibilities at home prevent that but that's nothing to dwell on.

I do have many things outside of modelling in my spare time (when I get some). I like to keep busy else I lapse into a weird mood. I am a rugby writer which is actually a job however it takes less than half a day to do. Plus my commercial tv work keeps me busy. Someone once said my CV is bigger than the bible! Talking of bibles I am also a Sunday School Teacher - yep seriously. Glamour model and church leader really go hand in hand! But as for ambitions and moving forward within a creative journey... I haven't really got one. I already love being creative and doing what I am doing so long may it continue.'

Photographer - Martin Fryatt


When I speak to photographers I ask about their gear, it's only fair you get to geek out too...do you have any go to items you can't live without?

'The gear I cannot live without...well that would be telling. I have a strange makeup item that got given to me years ago and its amazing and its my secret to apparently looking a hell of a lot younger that what I really am. So I cant tell you else I would have to kill you. Although im not really sure what it is anymore as the label fell off years ago. so once it runs out (and its getting pretty close) then I may just sag and bag.'

Studio - Zan Studio


Now for the shameless self promotion part of the interview...where can people find you and your work?

'You'd be pleased to note I'm not too much of a shameless plugger! I can be found on http://www.purpleport.com/portfolio/karenr every other modelling network site, Facebook, Flickr - KarenR and even Twitter although I am not a model who has lots of followers or tweets all the time. Same for publication work, I am not one for being plastered everywhere - I just like to keep busy. But hopefully you will like the images I create as that's what its all about. If I create a fabulous image with a great photographer then I love to show it off. Apart from that then im quite a private person.

I also have several youtube videos knocking around http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WI2CWS9HJfE and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2bVxTlrr09I - shameless plug over... so much for not showing off.'


I'd like to thank Karen again for taking the time to answer a few questions for me, be sure to check out all the links above for more of her work, as well as the links attached to the images for the other creatives involved in creating them.

Ian
http://facebook.com/guffoggthegeek
http://twitter.com/guffoggthegeek

Monday, 28 November 2016

I'm Dying...Ok, It's Only Man-Flu

You may have noticed a lack of new posts from me of late, that's because I'm extremely sick, like more sick than anyone has ever been, ever!

Ok, I only have a major bout of cold. Because of this I'm currently laid in bed, feeling extremely sorry for myself, and trying to recapture my youth by playing Pokemon Sun (I know I'm supposed to be a fully grown adult!).

'Where When How Wednesday' interviews will be unaffected by my frailness, and will be up as normal. I also have a few posts I'm halfway through writing and I'll aim to get them up ASAP.

Until I see you again, or I succumb to my ailments, I'm off to play Pokemon...speaking of which, if you play, leave your Nintendo friend code down below and we can trade/battle.


Ian
http://facebook.com/guffoggthegeek
http://twitter.com/guffoggthegeek

Wednesday, 23 November 2016

Where When How Wednesday - Imaginary Revolutionary

Welcome to 'Where When How Wednesday'. In these weekly posts I'll be interviewing creatives about their journey into the creative world, their works, and what makes them tick. This week I'm interviewing Jamie AKA Imaginary Revolutionary, a talented photographer based in Salford.


Hi Jamie, thank you for taking the time to answer some questions for me. We should probably start at the beginning, when and how did you come about getting into the world of photography?

'Blah, blah, blah, dusty attic, blah, blah, grandpa’s box brownie etc - To be honest I can’t actually remember my first camera or when I started taking pictures. I don’t have any recollection of being particularly prolific photo-wise when I was at school but when I did my Duke of Edinburgh’s Silver Award, I undertook photography as my skill. Armed with my point and shoot compact, the instructor tried his hardest to teach me about f stops and exposure but it largely fell on deaf ears. I have always had a camera but I never seemed to take many pictures apart from on holiday and special occasions - I was too frustrated with the wait to get them back from Boots (as well as the cost).

So I meandered along the periphery of photography until the advent of digital - I first came across it in Michael Connelly’s novel The Poet and I thought it was next-level stuff of science fiction but soon after I got my first digital compact and started taking pictures again in earnest. My compacts served their purpose perfectly I was using it for general snapshots and for pictures whilst out mountain biking and to this day, l carry a compact with me all the time. The turning points along my path came when I was invited to submit a cocktail recipe for a book which was being compiled by a big spirit brand - the result, which was a beautiful work was a disappointment to me because the person who made the drink for the photograph didn’t capture the drink as I had envisaged it and realised how words on paper could be misinterpreted so when I created drinks for clients I should be able to present them with an image of how it should look. This was when I realised I was hampered by compacts by not being able to control the depth of field so I looked on Gumtree and ended up buying my first digital SLR. My photography skills improved and I actually managed to properly learn about f-stops and exposure and I took to photographing anything that didn’t talk.'



Photography, especially online, tends to fall into specific genres and/or gets described as being a specific style. The trouble with this is it's quite subjective, the style someone views an image to be can often differ to the style the person creating it views it as. How would you describe the work you are putting out there?

'I think the only thing that’s fair to say is “in focus” and probably too much so! I’d like it if someone told me I had a certain style and in some cases I think I miss out on shoots because I don’t have one. I’m quite experimental and keen to try different techniques.'

Model - Robynne Vanessa

Model - Lilly Von Pink

Model - Arabella

Models - Sarah Holland & Jamie AKA Imaginary Revolutionary


Photography can have it's share of problems. I personally have a particular problem with self confidence. This confidence issue can and has caused me issues with my photography. Do you find any aspects of photography particularly challenging?

'I am plagued with insecurities - I decided to try to get into people photography to overcome shyness. As a bartender, I can talk to anyone from behind the bar - I am confident, almost to the point of arrogance, I can hold court and present to a room full of people - I get flown around the world to conduct seminars on cocktails and spirits and yet when away from the bar, I’m actually socially awkward - I much prefer to sit and watch people rather than engage in conversation - especially women seeing as the last 20 years of my life has pretty much seen me bear witness to a barrage of unwanted attention from guys who think they have a right to intrude in a person’s pleasant evening because they happen to have a pair of tits. I still couldn’t do street photography though, that for me is a step too far ‘cos I guess people think I look as dodgy as fuck anyway so if I’m carrying a camera I’m automatically avoided as a pervert or something.

Right now I’m comfortable and confident in my ability and aware of my limitations and constantly striving to improve. I would try to do more with my career but at the end of the day I’m just another guy with a camera who likes taking nice pictures and I’m fine with that! I’m still reticent to lay myself bare to critique though - I equally love and hate every picture I take but so long as the client loves them then I’m happy.'


In my series 'Foto Inspiration Friday' I share the people, images, places etc that I find give me inspiration. Who, or what, or where do you draw inspiration from?

'I’m not entirely sure - I have an appreciation for beauty and I like to see it everywhere and in everything; decay, dereliction, the mundane I obviously like the works of a lot of photographers and maybe there is a touch of influence creeping in from the sides but largely I am inspired by my surroundings.'


Sometimes images hold a special significance to us. It can be the first image we ever made, it can be an image drawing attention to a cause close to our hearts, it can simply be an image of someone we love. Do you have an image or images that hold a special significance to you?

'There are two for me which stand out in my portfolio and they are the ones which make me the most proud when I look at them. They are by no means my best pieces but that doesn’t take anything away from them in my eyes.



"Mesie" is the result of my first ever photo ‘mission’ - I’d seen this piece of graffiti as I’d been driving on the motorway during the day and from that viewpoint I envisaged a nighttime shot of the bridge spanning the motorway with light trails passing through the shot with the graffiti light-painted to make it stand out. I looked up on google maps how to get to the bridge, got all the kit together and set out to get the shot. I did not for one moment think it would be as difficult as it turned out. I had to climb a small fence and scrabble down a steep embankment in the pitch blacktop get my gear in place and get ready for the shot - all the time being aware that what I was doing was unlikely to be legal. I took all precautions to ensure that any motorists were’t distracted by my actions which I figured was the least I could do and after an hour or so I had the shots in the bag. Not long after, the graffiti was gone and has never been replaced!



"Splash" is a picture of my first-born and as such, all pictures of your kid hold a special place in your heart - this was his first day wearing wellies and we stepped out of the door and he saw this puddle and his eyes lit up. He spent the next 10 minutes running back and forth through the puddle with his face a picture of pure delight - as soon as he had done it once I sprinted back into the house to get my camera as I knew I had to try and capture some of the emotion he was experiencing.  A couple of shots later, he tripped and fell face-first into the puddle which halted the proceedings (caught it on camera too and feel extremely guilty because I find it hilarious every time I look at it - bad daddy!!) but again I caught a one-off moment which can’t be replicated.'


Photoshoots can sometimes leave you open to scary or funny situations. What's the scariest or funniest situation you've found yourself in because of photography?

'I’m a big scary-looking guy so I don’t tend to get into scary situations, I’m also not daft and will perform constant risk assessments to make sure I’m within my limits. I am strong and agile so I will put myself into some ridiculous and precarious positions to ‘get the shot’ but never at any risk to myself or my subjects. I remember when the riots in Salford were brewing (a few days after they kicked off in Tottenham) there was a temptation to go and get my camera to capture how things unfolded but I decided against it and read how a few guys had been beaten up and had their cameras nicked during the melĂ©e - being able to look after yourself becomes nigh on impossible when you’re in that kind of crowd. I can’t think of any hilarious situations I’ve found myself in either - I’m professional but I don’t take myself too seriously so I’d like to think my shoots are fun and relaxed but I haven't really had a situation where we’ve ended up rolling on the floor laughing!'


We've talked about your start in photography, we talked about your current work, let's quickly chat about the future. What have you got coming up this year, more of the same? Any special projects? Plus in regards to a more long term plan, where are you hoping your creative journey will take you in the years to come?

'I’m probably going to try and get into a long-term project but I need to have a strong subject. I’ve done a couple of successful yearly photo-a-day challenges but failed many more. I’ve recently realised that I’ve missed the challenge of doing a picture a day but it’s really hard (for me) to keep the momentum going, some have petered out after days, some I’ve done for months and months before falling out of creativity so I’m on the hunt for a new challenge. Otherwise I’m going to keep honing my skills and exploring as many genres as I can.'


We can't really talk photography without discussing gear, so...what is your 'go to' equipment that you find yourself gravitating towards the most on shoots?

'Strobes - I will take them with me on every shoot, either my Jinbei traveller which is 1200w/s of ‘bugger me that hurts my eyes’ or a case full of Yongnuo 580’s. I like to have control over the light as best I can, even if I just use them to boost the ambient and not make it look ‘flashy’ I don’t stray into the land of high iso so will augment the light whenever possible. I also use my tripod pretty much throughout the whole shoot too - indoors or out!'


Now for the shameless self promotion part of the interview...where can people find more of you and your work?

'Usually you’ll find me behind my bar at an amazing wedding venue in North Wales (http://www.iscoydpark.com seeing as it’s the shameless bit) or out and about talking about Gin (The King of Soho now that you ask)  but I do have a website which is largely portfolio hosting rather than a business-generating tool which is http://www.jamiestephenson.photography and my Facebook page http://facebook.com/jamiestephensonphotography. I will post most things, good or bad, to my Flickr account though http://www.flickr.com/photos/alternateperspective/albums
There’s also some of my favourite drinks photography on my (sadly neglected) blog http://www.thecocktail.guru'


I'd like to thank Jamie again for taking the time to answer a few questions for me. Be sure to check out the links for more of his work, and the links attached to the images for the other creatives involved.

Ian
http://facebook.com/guffoggthegeek
http://twitter.com/guffoggthegeek

Wednesday, 16 November 2016

Where When How Wednesday - Tony Nutley

Welcome to 'Where When How Wednesday'. In these weekly posts I'll be interviewing creatives about their journey into the creative world, their works, and what makes them tick.

Whilst you may not recognise my guest today by name, I am confident you will have seen some of his work...today I'm interviewing Tony Nutley.

John Thaw & Nick Robinson in Goodnight Mister Tom


Hi Tony, thank you for taking the time to answer some questions. We should probably start at the beginning, when and how did you come about getting into the world of photography?

'I left school to go into the RAF to become a pilot, they’d already taught me how to fly up to the standard needed to obtain my Private Pilot’s License. However at the time I was joining it was a period when they didn’t want many pilots as national service was just finishing and loads of squadrons were being disbanded. They asked me to wait for a couple of years. My parents couldn’t afford for me to remain at school or have any further education so the RAF suggested joining them and doing any job I fancied for two years. I’d spent years at school doing ‘O’ and ‘A’ levels, and the job was obviously only temporary, so I picked something that looked like it was fun, not hard work…Photography. They tried for an hour to change my mind, offering me far more worthy jobs, telling me that this was the most stupid job I could have picked, but I stuck to my guns.  OK I accepted that this was a complete waste of everyone’s time and effort, but in my mind I could see myself in the future as a pilot who could take really good pictures.

I knew nothing about photography I just went in blind, they put me on an experimental advanced course, and then decided I was really good at it, I never quite believed them, every one else on the course claimed they were experts and knew everything about photography when they joined, and I believed them, I had a permanent inferiority complex for the eight months of the course, even when I passed out very near the top. Two years later at the point I was thinking of applying to starting flying they offered me a really advanced course, I decided to take that first then go on to the flying, but I then got totally hooked into photography, I was starting to believe people when they were saying I was good. I then won a very prestigious RAF photographic competition two years running which in effect labelled me the best photographer in the RAF. My name was splashed around my local papers (I was in Germany at the time) and my home television company contacted me about working for them. When I came back to England they got in touch again and asked me to work for them for a week, the money they offered was huge so I agreed to give up a week of my leave to do it. The week was a great success and they asked for more, it ended up with me spending a year working 5 days for the RAF and 2 days for Southern Television. Finally the RAF said I had to choose between the two, so I thanked the RAF for their time and became a freelance TV stills photographer. By my 5th month  I was earning double what I’d have earned in a year in the Air Force and never looked back.'

Ringo Starr - Narrator of Thomas The Tank Engine (and Beatles member)


As a freelance TV stills photographer, what did your job entail?

'I was a stills photographer, I worked on Films and Television programs, taking the still pictures that would be used for publicity and to help ‘sell’ the program. The pictures would be used in magazines, national and local newspapers, on posters, books, DVD’s and now on the internet.

I worked with the actors on set whilst they were filming, and I’d also take them to studios or areas where I could create a studio, taking set up pictures that could be used for magazine, DVD, and book covers etc.

I worked exclusively on film until around 2002 when when I switched entirely on to digital.

I was always freelance so could work for whoever I wanted, this included ITV, BBC, Pebble Mill, BBC Northern Ireland, Channel 4, Five, Disney, HBO, ABC, SF (Sweden), and ABC (Australia). I mostly favoured ITV as I had great contacts there and if two jobs overlapped for any reason they’d help fix it, BBC were not so helpful if it were an ITV job, so eventually I just sort of drifted away from them.'

Anthony Hopkins & Rebecca Pidgeon in The Dawning


Of all the films and TV shows you worked on, do you have a favourite?

'This is incredibly difficult to answer, picking out one film or TV series from several hundred worked on over 45 years is near impossible . 

Sharpe has to be there at the top really, five seasons, fourteen 2 hour episodes, and then two trips to India for another three episodes (two stories) nine years later. Almost everyone on there became close friends, from the producer down to the sparks. When I first went on it only people who’d read Bernard Cornwell’s books had heard of Sharpe, when it finished more than half the country had. It was great working with Sean and all the cast, I almost can’t think of anyone who was a pain to work with on it (well maybe a couple of the minor players), and so many actors starred in it, Sharpes Eagle had a young Daniel Craig as the villain. Emily Mortimer, Elizabeth Hurley, Brian Cox, Julian Glover, Mark Strong, Pete Postlethwaite, and so many others starred in at least one episode.

It was great to photograph, lavish costumes, loads of colour, masses of action beautiful women, horses, explosions, fights, killing, and the papers couldn’t get enough of it, so lots of my work was being used all the time which made it all worthwhile. 

Someone described Sharpe as a series of films where Sharpe meets a newcomer and a woman at the beginning of the show, screws the woman has a big battle and kills the newcomer, and in the next program repeats the exercise, a bit of a simplification but not so inaccurate.

One great thing about Sharpe was that it was almost always filmed abroad, The Crimea, Turkey, Portugal, and India. Oh and one program on the Yorkshire Moors, we lived in hotels, so in the evening rather than everyone going home we all went back to the same hotel which made for a great social life, and lots of bonding, and you tend to become a team rather than a crew.  

Sharpe has to be the winner, but I also liked working on Morse and Cadfael, and Foyles War, again great actors and good to work with.'

Sean Bean in Sharpe


This may be a difficult question to answer too...which actor/actress did you enjoy working with the most?

'Who was best to work with? That is impossible to answer, I usually was involved in a film or TV drama on and off over a period of 2 or 3 months, then I could go 6 months without seeing the actor or actress again and sometimes it was never, so you fell in and out of friendships. At different times of the year someone else was your favourite so let me name half a dozen (or more).

Definitely Sean Bean, also John Thaw for the later years, the first two years we hated each other (it’s too long a story to tell here), Derek Jacobi, Anthony Hopkins, believe it or not Prince Edward, I worked with him for Ardent his TV company, he is unbelievably pleasant to work with, I got on really well with Trevor Eve not everyone did, and finally Peter Davidson who I only worked with occasionally but was great to work with each time. 

As for females Tara Fitzgerald, Elizabeth Hurley, Emilia Fox, Juliet Aubrey, Honeysuckle Weeks, it goes on and on. The trouble with this question is that everyone assumes they are all luvvies and a complete pain in the arse, whereas they’re not, 95% are perfectly normal just like you or me, well me anyway!'


Having asked who you enjoyed working with, I have to ask...was there anyone who you had a nightmare of a time working with?

'I can’t really mention who was difficult to work with that would be very rude, so having thought hard about it I’ve decided not to mention Ruby Wax, Des O’Connor, Boy George, Adam Ant, or Elizabeth McGovern!'


Photography, especially online, tends to fall into specific genres and/or gets described as being a specific style. The trouble with this is it's quite subjective, the style someone views an image to be can often differ to the style the person creating it views it as. How would you describe the work your personal work?

'What I’m doing now I suppose is a soft form of glamour, I’ve drifted into it really, my job has always  been to make people look as good as I humanely can (apart from the bad guys) and that’s really what I’m still doing, I enjoy doing it because for once I’m photographing people who want to be photographed, and I can do it any way I want. When I first started photographing models I was a lot more adventurous, now I’m getting older I’m simplifying everything down, I rarely use large lights anymore, the vast majority of my pictures taken in the last two years are taken with one or two small Yongnuo speedlights and a small modifier, I find it tiring lugging large softboxes with big lighting stands around so I’ve drifted into simplicity. Do I have a style? I wasn’t aware of it but I must have, I’m told people recognize my pictures fairly easily, in a strange way I’m quite pleased about that, I’ve gone from large Elinchrom lights with £800 softboxes to £45 speedlights and they claim they haven’t noticed a change, although I absolutely do.'

Michael Kitchen


Photography can have it's share of problems. I personally have a particular problem with self confidence. This confidence issue can and has caused me issues with my photography. Do you find any aspects of photography particularly challenging?


'Without wanting to sound arrogant I have absolutely no self confidence issues, I was a successful working professional for 55 years, I could never have achieved that if I wasn’t totally confident, my technique was ingrained into me from the beginning, I didn’t have to bother about ASA’s, ISO’s apertures, shutter speeds, depth of fields, etc. I just fixed them without really thinking about it, and nowadays I’ve always got ‘P’ to fall back on.

Possibly the only thing that I find challenging is landscape photography. My real problem being that I’m now extremely lazy, The thought of getting up early enough for dawn shots horrifies me, I’m normally home eating by the time the sunsets happen, and I don’t like walking too far, I love mountains but live miles from any, so what I really need is a great view very close to a car park that will work around mid morning or afternoon. So far the best place I have found is Ashness Bridge in the Lake District, you can park about 15 yards from the best spot to photograph it, the main drawback being a million other people have also had the same idea and have got the same picture so I’ve never really succeeded in this particular genre and yet in a way I’d love to but never will, I’ll never fix the early mornings.'


In my series 'Foto Inspiration Friday' I share the people, images, places etc that I find give me inspiration. Who, or what, or where do you draw inspiration from?

'I’m stumped on this one, I really can’t say anyone or anything inspires me, I don’t really follow other photographers, I’ve never heard of most of them. There are certain pictures that I really like and some photographers who have pictures I look at and like, there are also believe it or not some on Purpleport that I like, but none inspire me. Find a photographer with good pictures and you’ll also find some rubbish he or she has taken as well, I like a fair bit of Bailey’s work, but he also has a lot I don’t like, I quite like  some of Annie Leibovitz’s stuff but then you have last years Pirelli calendar?? I look at my stuff and find there’s a load of dross in there dominating the good stuff.

I loved the technique of Herb Ritts, and a lot of his work, but inspire me, no sorry. 

I think the real danger in being inspired by somebody is that you’ll find yourself trying to copy or emulate them, and that just spells disaster. How many times do you see “inspired by ……. and not only does the picture look nothing like it was supposed to, it usually looks plain awful. It’s best not to have idols, just follow your own path be your own person, be different, especially if it’s your profession because then you have to look different from everyone else to succeed.'

Sean Bean in Sharpe


Sometimes images hold a special significance to us. It can be the first image we ever made, it can be an image drawing attention to a cause close to our hearts, it can simply be an image of someone we love. Do you have an image or images that hold a special significance to you?

'Probably the picture that is my absolute favourite is a set up picture that I took of Sean Bean on Sharpe series two. Every picture that you’ll ever see of Sharpe is mine, I did all 16 episodes, but this one was a bit special. Central wanted a picture of Sharpe and Wellington standing on 150 dead soldiers (there was a good reason), I told them as I left that it would be impossible but they wouldn’t listen. When I got to the Crimea (where the first three series was shot) I found there were only ten soldiers left and Wellington had gone back to the UK the day before as they finished his scenes early. Eventually after much arguing and whining I was offered Sean and the ten soldiers for ten minutes in the afternoon at a different spot than I wanted. I ‘borrowed’ a prop guy and between us we made that ‘enclave’ by scrounging, borrowing, and stealing, believe me it’s difficult stealing a cannon and dragging for one hundred yards across rough ground. I had to persuade 10 Russian truck drivers to move their lorries which were in my line of site. Next I needed 150 yards of a huge electric cable and an Arri Sun lamp dragging over to me, that involved bribes including a bottle of really good wine. Finally I had to persuade 10 Russian soldiers to lay on the frozen ground in temperatures of minus 20C, that cost me 20 Marlborough’s for each soldier plus a print signed by Sean (he was unaware of my generosity at the time). 

Despite the sun, the temperature was freezing, and it was literally blowing a gale. Sean arrived and I took the pictures, I was the only person including Sean who felt the idea would work, but all the time I was taking the pictures I could see they were good.

I got back to England and the Head of Photography at Central went berserk because I hadn’t taken what he had asked for. One week later he phoned and apologized, as he’d just seen the pictures and said mine were far better than what he’d asked for, he pretty well left me to decide what to take from then on. The series producer was so pleased he persuaded me to work with him on Inspector Morse, and I worked with John Thaw on every film that he starred in from then on until his untimely death.

A seven foot high version of that picture welcomed you at the entrance of Carlton Studios for years, and still regularly appears in magazines and newspapers today, it opened a lot of doors for me.'

John Thaw & Kevin Whately in Inspector Morse


Photoshoots can sometimes leave you open to scary or funny situations. What's the scariest or funniest situation you've found yourself in because of photography?

'I was at home when I received a call from a TV producer asking me to go to Parkhurst prison on the Isle of Wight, I explained to him that I wouldn’t be able to get in as I hadn’t been cleared by the Home Office. Don’t worry he said I’ll fix it. It took me an hour and a half to get there, I turned up and found that they were expecting me, I just had to sign a register, and I was in.

I was met inside by the producer who then explained that we were going into ‘C’Wing, this was a prison within a prison where the worst of the worst were held, people like the Krays and such, these were the scary people.
Once again I was just signed in without a problem and there I was inside one of the heaviest of British prisons.

I was taken to the wardens office and I asked what I could take pictures of, “Anything you like as long as the inmates don’t object”, and I was off, everyone wanted their pictures taken, I had guys staring through bars with hangdog expressions, leaning at their cell doors, sat on their beds, anything I asked for I got, this was obviously fun for them.

Then a little guy turned up and asked very politely if I could photograph him with his budgie on his head, that was no problem I could fix that, I was in his cell with him and his budgie when I was aware that it had gone quite dark, I turned round and almost wet myself, there was a huge ugly man just staring at me with a very frightening expression on his face, I sort of panicked, I didn’t know whether to scream, shout or play dead, I don’t think I’ve ever been as scared, all I could think was how could I be so stupid as to wander off on my own in such a high security prison, did I have no brains.

We had a sort of stand off, I thought he was letting me say my final prayers before he finished me off, he’d still not said anything to me, he just stared. Then suddenly a little skinny guy squeezed into the cell grinned at me and said ”He wants to be photographed with the budgie as well”, I turned round to the budgie owner and snatched the bird from his head, and in a squeaky voice said no problem, put the budgie on the big guys head, and took the photograph, he then turned round and left the cell, at no point did he say anything.

As fast as I could I shot down to the warders room and told them what had happened, they just laughed and said the big guy was harmless and the little guy was his boyfriend.
I didn’t move from the company of the crew again all afternoon.

There is a follow up to this, the next morning, I was still in bed, when I got a phone call from the home office saying they wanted all my films as I should never have been allowed into the prison in the first place, like a good photographer I said they couldn’t have them, but they then said they’d withdraw permission for the film to be shown, and within seconds the TV company was on to me saying give them the films, the pictures were of no real use to me anyway so I gave them to them. I never even saw the pictures but at least I got paid and learned to think a little bit more on my jobs in future.

I’ve photographed in six prisons since but I’ve never strayed away on my own again.'

Prince Edward The Earl of Wessex


We've talked about your start in photography, we talked about your current work, let's quickly chat about the future. What have you got coming up this year, more of the same? Any special projects? Plus in regards to a more long term plan, where are you hoping your creative journey will take you in the years to come?

'Hahaha, I’m 76 years old, my best long term plan is to survive until I’m 80! I’m retired now, although I did work for three weeks in March on a Swedish film in Stockholm, the drive has gone, now I just take pictures for fun.

Coming up this year, I don’t know, I tend to make decisions at the last minute, I rarely plan ahead more than a week at a time and I never plan the actual pictures, I just turn up and take something. I have no burning ambition anymore, in my field I feel I’ve done it all, I reached my zenith and am now easing down, I still love my photography and try each time I take pictures, but the hard passion has vanished, I no longer feel I have to be the best in my field like I did before, now as long as I like the picture I’m happy.

Perhaps I’ve become a boring old man, happy with his golf and photography, but at least I’m very relaxed and happy about it all.'

John Thaw in Kavanagh QC


We can't really talk photography without discussing gear, so...what is your 'go to' equipment that you find yourself gravitating towards the most on shoots?

'At the moment I possess a Canon 1Ds Mk 111, a Canon 1D Mk 1V, c/w 10 lenses (6 prime and 4 Zoom), and a mass of film equipment that’ll never be used again.

I’ve a load of different lights but I’m mainly using my little pile of 10 Yongnou 560 11’s,111’s, and 1V’s. Why so many, mainly because the upgrades were worth changing up for, once the 560TX controllers came out, and the things are ludicrously cheap, I can now control everything from my camera providing I can remember which flash is which.

So my ‘go to’ camera is the Canon 1Ds plus the 70-200 f2.8L Mk11 lens, and I would imagine 85% of my pictures are taken on that, I will use the 135 f2, and the 24-70mm f2,8 and even if possible the 300 f2.8, but really if you took away the 70-200mm lens I think I’d go into a two year sulk and stop all my photography.'

Timothy Dalton hosting In The Wild


Now for the shameless self promotion...where can people find more of you and your work?

'I don’t really bother with self publicity, I’ve a half finished website that I know I’ll never finish because I don’t want anyone phoning me about work, and that’s it... http://tonynutley.pro'

Jon Pertwee & Una Stubbs in Worzel Gummidge


I'd like to thank Tony again for taking the time to answer a few questions for me. I'd also like to congratulate him on his wedding anniversary which happens to be today!


Ian
http://facebook.com/guffoggthegeek
http://twitter.com/guffoggthegeek

Tuesday, 15 November 2016

Travelling Creative Tuesday - Rubber Bands

As someone within the photography world, travelling somewhere you don't really know is likely to happen at some point. With that in mind, and with a deep love for food...so deep my wife worries I love pizza more than I love her...I came up with 'Travelling Creative Tuesday'. In 'Travelling Creative Tuesday' I, and guest writers will be sharing useful tips and amenities for travelling creatives, be they places to get food, studios, locations, accommodation, supplies...if it's useful, or sells food, we'll be sharing it.

Whilst watching my wife chew merrily on a rubber band the other day (don't worry, it's just one of the quirks that made me marry her!) I started pondering the many, many uses the unassuming little beggars have. More often than not, when out and about shooting, your stuff just will not behave. Things will roll around, small stuff will hide in your bag, bits will need attaching to other bits...you get the idea.

After extensively researching things designed to tie stuff together, ok having grabbed the closest thing to hand one time (can you imagine how boring researching that would be!), I always have rubber bands in my camera bag, and on my wrist.

Rubber bands, I have found, solved most issues I have ever come across....even keeping my wife happy and quiet while she chomps away (she prefers the taste of purple ones). Forever losing track of my batteries, I was often only able to find three when needing four, now I have them bunched in fours. My memory card holder, whilst great for keeping my memory cards together, kept sliding around my bag, now it's 'bungee'd' to the internal zip. As I am poor by circumstance and tight by birth (I'm from Yorkshire), I've yet to spend money on stuff like bounce cards. Because of this I often use scraps of paper or cardboard, and I've found rubber bands hold them onto my speedlight quite nicely.

I'll leave it at that otherwise it'll just descend into 'you can use them for this, and this, oh and this'. What I'm trying to get across is, rubber bands, elastic bands, gum bands, lacky bands, call them what you will, those little rings of...well rubber, are useful little thingamabobs to have with you when shooting.


Ian
http://facebook.com/guffoggthegeek
http://twitter.com/guffoggthegeek

Wednesday, 9 November 2016

Where When How Wednesday - 1234dist

Welcome to 'Where When How Wednesday'. In these weekly posts I'll be interviewing creatives about their journey into the creative world, their works, and what makes them tick. This week I'm interviewing Craig AKA 1234dist about his recent move into the world of photography.

Model - Louisemac


Hi Craig, thank you for taking the time to answer some questions. We should probably start at the beginning, when and how did you come about getting into the world of photography?

'Being honest, it's only in the last two months I've really started to pay attention to getting the images I want rather than the images I get. I've always been snap happy but never really paid much attention to even having the image in focus. One day I decided it was time to make a change as I love to be challenged so I decided to get a better camera than an iphone and see how good, bad or ugly I could shoot.'

Model - Dante-Layla


Photography, especially online, tends to fall into specific genres and/or gets described as being a specific style. The trouble with this is it's quite subjective, the style someone views an image to be can often differ to the style the person creating it views it as. Do you know what you are looking to put out there, or are you still very much finding your style?

'I always have a spark of inspiration and get get to shoot it quick enough sometimes. As for subjectivity, being a novice I know not everyone will see or be happy with the outcome of my images but as a training system, if it doesn't make it to my cutting room floor, I class it as a good image. As for a specific style, I haven't got one as I've not shot enough of any one thing to decide that it's the genre I want to prioritise.'

Model - Emma Darling


Photography can have it's share of problems. I personally have a particular problem with self confidence. This confidence issue can and has caused me issues with my photography. Have you found any aspects of photography particularly challenging so far?

'I come from a sales background so I'm used to that uncomfortable, out of comfort zone feelings. I think because I have a good idea what I want to shoot and where by the time we are on location it makes both myself and the model at ease and thanks to my humour, most shoots fly by.'

Model - RosieB


In my series 'Foto Inspiration Friday' I share the people, images, places etc that I find give me inspiration. Who, or what, or where do you draw inspiration from?

'It can be from anywhere, tv, film, emails even ebay before now. I also get a lot of pose ideas from other peoples work on PP and I love getting the models input in pre comms.

I also like to message models who say they want to work with me to see if they have an inspirational idea as that would influence how quickly I work with that model.'


Sometimes images hold a special significance to us. It can be the first image we ever made, it can be an image drawing attention to a cause close to our hearts, it can simply be an image of someone we love. Do you have an image or images that hold a special significance to you?

'I think its the images I currently have as my avatar and header on Purpleport at the moment. My Avatar was from my very first shoot with Louisemac and was one of the first images I did with a model that took little or no editing other than changing it to black and white and just loved it. My header picture was my second shoot with a model AlexiLou, also my first nude shoot and a picture I had in my head from initially first planning the location and managed to get exactly what my head had pictured weeks earlier.'

Model - Alexilou


Photoshoots can sometimes leave you open to scary or funny situations. What's the scariest or funniest situation you've found yourself in so far because of photography?

'I was doing an urbex shoot at an abandoned building, on the day before the shoot, I went down to check the location was still suitable and everything was still perfect. When I came back the next day with Dante-Layla we found that the council had come in the day before and completely secured the area. Thankfully with this shoot being in my hometown, I had a backup location handy but it definitely ate into the time we had to shoot.'



We've talked about your start in photography, we talked about your current work, let's quickly chat about the future. What have you got coming up this year, any plans? Any special projects? Plus in regards to a more long term plan, where are you hoping your creative journey will take you in the years to come?

'As of today I am having my first studio shoot at Millwood Studio as a 1-2-1 training session to show me studio lighting and what difference it can make and then come November I'll be hanging my camera up for a while and delving a little deeper into the features of PhotoShop. As I am self teaching, it takes a little longer and needs more focus but I have accumulated a good amount of images to work with now. At the moment I have only managed light manipulation so it will be interesting to get to the image manipulation stages too. I come from an IT background and tend to learn software quickly so I'm hopeful I should be able to improve my ability with the correct editing.'

Model - KierB


We can't really talk photography without discussing gear, so...what is your 'go to' equipment that you find yourself gravitating towards the most on shoots?

'My first four shoots on my profile were done on a Fuji S8000 which was ok as a transition from the iPhone point and click days. I knew it wouldn't be enough to do what I wanted it to do but don't have an unlimited budget so last month I moved to a Nikon D3200 with Shanny Flash. I could see the improvements instantly but was still working in comfort zone jpeg. After a considerable amount of research and use of the groups on PP I moved over to raw and was instantly rewarded with a mountain of tools I previously didn't have which has vastly improved my images. Looking at my profile, and seeing as I'm only two months in, it's really interesting to see the transitions in my images as my ability to not only shoot but edit the shoot to what I want to see. I know I've a long way to go and an uphill struggle but i'm enjoying the journey so far and with a pletara of models and a head full of idea's, the future is bright, with a sepia filter.'

Model - Heather N


Now for the shameless self promotion part of the interview...where can people find more of you and your work?

'As I am still new, I'm not at the stages of having a dedicated website, blog or wordpress so at the moment all my images are available on my purpleport profile...

http://purpleport.com/portfolio/1234dist'



I'd like to thank Craig again for taking the time to answer a few questions for me. Be sure to check out the links for more of his work, and the links attached to the images for the other creatives involved.


Ian
http://facebook.com/guffoggthegeek
http://twitter.com/guffoggthegeek

Friday, 4 November 2016

Raging Ranter - Assumptions - AKA, The Internets Dismay At The Lack Of Lady Flesh On Display

A few days back Tony & Chelsea Northrup published a video titled 'Chelsea's bubble bath BOUDOIR photoshoot'. Having watched them for some time now the video was pretty much what I expected, albeit with a different topless fella...I was in the camp expecting an oiled up Matt Granger.

In less than 48 hours the video amassed around 38k views, 33k of which occurred in the first 24 hours. As much as I love the content Tony & Chelsea put out, I suspect a decent part of those views did not come from people who like me watch all their content upon release...ok most of it, I've probably missed some. I suspect (well suspected, at this part of the post let's pretend that I haven't already read the comments and found 'proof') a large portion of their views came from the assumptions people made seeing the title 'Chelsea's bubble bath BOUDOIR photoshoot' accompanied by an image of Chelsea.

I could try rationalise these assumptions, spew some bollocks about something...actually, I can't! I thought about it and I just couldn't do it! Judging by the like to dislike ration, and rather more damningly various comments (see, proof...sort of!) many people made an assumption and went for one reason...well, two reasons.

Whilst Tony & Chelsea put the video up mainly as a joke, and it, along with the disappointment caused to many, was in fact funny, it does indeed raise a bloody good point about the assumptions made on the internet, or rather these assumptions power to make people view your content.

Your contents title can be as accurate as you like, there'll always be people who make assumptions and view it, not because of what it is, but because of what they're expecting. Take for example Tony & Chelsea's video. Despite their channel header, about page and various video thumbnails clearly displaying Chelsea as a photographer, a vast amount of people flocked to the video thinking they'd see Chelsea's soaped up boobies.

I'm not naive, I've always known people make assumptions about anything and everything, I've found myself on the receiving end more than once...granted, I didn't quite know the level of fuckwittery that it can achieve. What never occurred to me was the power these assumptions have on the reception of your content.

This realisation has raised questions in my mind. Is it acceptable to manipulate these assumptions for the purpose of garnering a wider audience for your work? How would people react finding their assumptions wrong? For example, how would people react if say a photographer posted a link titled 'pair of great tits' instead of 'pair of parus major'? Would they feel used? Lied to? Would they resent the photographer? In a world where competition is vast and content is so easily available, is it necessary in order to make sure your content is viewed over the competitions?

(When I say manipulate peoples assumptions, I mean use titles, links etc that whilst still 100% accurate to the content, could be misinterpreted. I'm not talking the kinda click bait shit that YouTuber's do where the content of the video has the most fleeting reference to the title!)

Really this post needs audience participation, so please, whatever reason brought you here, be it you enjoy reading my ramblings, sheer boredom, the various tags hinting at the displaying of bewbs...share with me your thoughts!

Ian
http://facebook.com/guffoggthegeek
http://twitter.com/guffoggthegeek

Wednesday, 2 November 2016

Where When How Wednesday - StuArtful2

Welcome to 'Where When How Wednesday'. In these weekly posts I'll be interviewing creatives about their journey into the creative world, their works, and what makes them tick. This week I'm interviewing Stuart AKA StuArtful2, a talented photographer based in Warrington.

Model - SophieNE


Hi Stuart, thank you for taking the time to answer some questions. We should probably start at the beginning, when and how did you come about getting into the world of photography?

'I’ve always had a camera since being a kid and then growing up developing my own b&w prints. That combined with drawing and painting were always my passion but I never knew until later in life how much. Later on I did a desktop publishing evening class that introduced me to Photoshop and after that I was hooked. Only recently though have I pursued portrait photography as something that I love to do.'


In my series 'Foto Inspiration Friday' I share the people, images, places etc that I find give me inspiration. Who, or what, or where do you draw inspiration from?

'I love artwork in all its forms so for me my foremost inspirations come from painters, film makers, comic book artists and the like. Painters such as Caravaggio, Rembrandt and Alfonse Mucha. Film makers like Ridley Scott, Luc Besson and Steven Speilberg. Comic book artists like Alex Ross, Bryan Hitchand and Jim Lee.'



Photography, especially online, tends to fall into specific 'genres' and/or gets described as being a specific 'style'. In this world where everything has to have a 'style' what would you recommend for people trying to find their own?

'Trial and error really. Try it, if it works use it, if it doesn’t try something else. Learn techniques and tips from as many sources as you can and incorporate what you like and what works for you into your own work flow and style.'

Make Up - Mel Vic Make Up


Photography can have it's share of problems. I personally have a particular problem with self confidence. This confidence issue can and has caused me issues with my photography. Do you find any aspects of photography particularly challenging?

'I’m not a particularly outgoing person in fact I was very shy in my younger days but I’ve found pushing myself to shoot and work with as many different people as I can has really helped me to be a better photographer. Having a network of people you can collaborate with is invaluable. So my advice would be to get out there and do it. Don’t worry about rejections because you’re bound to get some knock backs but if you love what you do then that passion will be your fuel!'

Model - Kristy Leonie


You mentioned being shy, and thus having to push yourself to work with as many people as you can. When it comes to the shoots themselves, how did/do you counteract any nerves you may still have?

'For me preparation is the key. Going into a shoot with a clear idea of what you want to achieve and being confident in your own abilities to achieve your goal is very important. If you have that confidence then everyone around you will pick up on that and the results will reflect that and vice versa...
Models - Lilly Von Pink & Jazzbarnett  Taken At - VIP Images

...So when I worked with two models, with a theme in mind, it could have been disastrous but because I’d reached a level of achievement that I was confident in I was able to direct the shoot along the lines I wanted.'

Model - CherP  Make Up & Stylist - Zena


We've talked about your start in photography, let's quickly chat about the future. What have you got coming up this year? More of the same? Any special projects? Plus in regards to a more long term plan, where are you hoping your creative journey will take you in the years to come?

'I'm aiming to curate my work and website to show just my more professional work and thus bring in more paying clientele. Themes wise perhaps more high fashion with an artistic twist.'

Make Up - Zena


We can't really talk photography without discussing gear, so...what is your 'go to' equipment that you find yourself gravitating towards the most on shoots?

'Since I don’t have my own studio I have to carry everything I’m ever going to need on a shoot with me which includes lights, modifiers, stands, backdrops, camera body and multiple lenses, batteries …. and the list goes on. I must admit I’m kinda hooked on artificial light. I love the beauty dish in all it’s incarnations be it with the grid, sock or just as it is. The quality of the light really depends on the shoot and the mood you’re trying to achieve.'

Model - SophieNE


Now for the shameless self promotion part of the interview...where can people find more of you and your work?

'My work can be seen here : http://purpleport.com/portfolio/stuartful2
and here : http://www.stuartful.com
and my retouching work here : http://www.facebook.com/StuArtfulPhoto/
and of course current work on FB & IG here : http://www.facebook.com/stuart.thornes.7
http://www.instagram.com/stuartful'


I'd like to thank Stuart again for taking the time to answer a few questions for me. Be sure to check out the links for more of his work, and the links attached to the images for the other creatives involved.


Ian
http://facebook.com/guffoggthegeek
http://twitter.com/guffoggthegeek