Tuesday, 17 April 2018

Why Work...When You Can Watch The Girl In The Photographs


Poster for The Girl In The Photographs from Vertical Entertainment


In the same way Richard Hammond should be forcibly removed from the vehicle he is undoubtedly in when he says "just one more run", or "watch this". I should shut off the movie I'm about to watch when I mutter the phrase "sounds like an interesting premise". This is not a new notion, I had this epiphany many years ago. So long ago now I can't remember what actually caused it. The trouble is, I usually fail to listen to this pretty sound advice...and that's why I find myself writing this review...

Browsing the options on Shudder (think Netflix for horror nuts) one evening I stumbled across The Girl In The Photographs. My passion for photography and my passion for horror films fused, and it had an interesting sounding premise...'A bored young woman in a sleepy community called Spearfish starts receiving photographs of brutally murdered young women. Are they real or staged? The culprit is either a serial killer or some creep with a sick sense of humour.'

Another deciding factor in my choosing to watch The Girl In The Photographs was the involvement of Wes Craven as executive producer. It was actually the last project Craven worked on before he sadly passed away and the film is dedicated to him. Whilst I have admired Craven and his work for many years, and I can understand wanting to impress him, one problem I have with the film is it feels less like a film with homages to the great man, and more like a film desperately trying to appear as if he himself made it. To give an example of this, the film opens with a fairly recognisable actress killed off very quickly...a la Scream.

Speaking of Scream. Where Scream and other successful horror films work well is in the characters. Making them relatable, likeable, and/or making them grow as a person. All these things make you invest in the character, it makes you root for them, it gives you that AWWW moment if something happens to them. I can only assume the makers of The Girl In The Photographs don't want you to suffer that emotional turmoil because none of the characters are that likeable. The 'lead' Colleen spends the majority of the film looking miffed. The 'token good guy' is beyond boring. The 'token cops' are useless and uninterested. The 'token jock' and 'token cheerleader' types are bitchy, and as far as I can tell only in the film for the obligatory sex leading to death scene. Worst of all is the 'token prick', in this instance Kal Penn's Peter Hemmings, a photographer and absolute prick of the highest order...this is purely conjecture on my part but I suspect he's based on a photographer who's name rhymes with Rerry Tichardson.

Visually, the film is stunning. Mind you, with someone like Dean Cundey (Halloween, Back To The Future, Jurassic Park) working on it, it's no wonder.

The story and characters decisions, even by horror movie standards, felt illogical to me. To me it felt like they had some ideas set in stone, but the 'inbetweens' were almost an afterthought. As well as the bizarre choices, some stuff seemed unnecessary. At the risk of ridicule from my wife and proof reader, the sex tape scene between the 'token jock' and 'token cheerleader' served, to my mind, no real purpose. I'll go one further to illustrate my point. Towards the end is a scene that is both illogical and unnecessary. When shit has really hit the fan Colleen tries to find a hiding place, in case someone comes in through the door. Colleen's hiding place of choice, under a desk. A classic of the horror movie genre. The problem, the gap she is in faces the door offering her no cover whatsoever. I can only guess, and this is purely a guess, but I think the whole point of this scene was the Michael Bay like close up of her arse in denim short shorts as she crawled.

The ending...the cherry on top...proving to me I really did waste an hour and half of my life. In a lot of horror films, especially slasher films, there's a showdown at the end between the crazy (or crazies) and the final survivor(s). Sure, afterwards you often get a jump scare laying the groundwork for a sequel, but you get a showdown. The end of The Girl In the Photographs however, lets just say it doesn't follow the tried and tested fan favourite formula...whilst bloody, it's anti-fucking-climatic.

Whilst the film is, meh, the kills are bloody, and for the most part grounded in reality, which I applaud them for. Whilst I don't expect that much realism in horror, basic human biology can't be ignored when people are getting stabbed, decapitated, strangled and the like. Well, it can, but the ridulousness can often detract from the horror making it farcical. Also, I personally have always found the 'wacko with weapons' a scarier villain purely because it's an actual possibility.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not highbrow with my movie choices. Nor do I expect that much story, or realism within a horror movie. A little story, motivation, character progression, or a reason to root for the characters would be nice. Sadly, The Girl In The Photographs has none of these, and it's flaws completely overshadow a few decent kills and some impressive visuals.


Ian
https://facebook.com/guffoggthegeek
https://twitter.com/guffoggthegeek

Monday, 16 April 2018

Guffogg's Guest - Miss Diamond Sparkle

Welcome to 'Guffogg's Guest'. The series in which I interview creatives about their journey into the creative world, their works, and what makes them tick. This week I'm interviewing Slough based model, Miss Diamond Sparkle.

Miss Diamond Sparkle
Miss Diamond Sparkle shot by C-Imagery


Hi Miss Diamond Sparkle. Thank you for taking a little time to answer some questions for me. How is it you found yourself in the modelling world?

'I had always wanted to be a model and when I met my partner (still currently tolerating me, haha) he knew that I wanted to be a model, so he said well do it then if that is what you want to do...it all went from there really'

Miss Diamond Sparkle
Miss Diamond Sparkle shot by _Seamus


That's great that you have such a supportive partner. I'm blessed with a one too, as long as she doesn't have to hear about anything technical. I talk technical and she'll probably nod off. I believe not all are so lucky. How long have you and your partner been together?

'We've been together 7 years now.'

Miss Diamond Sparkle
Miss Diamond Sparkle shot by Allan Forbes


What is it that keeps you in the modelling world, why are you a model?

'What keeps me in the modelling world are so many things. But the main things are the different people (with their characters) you meet and seeing pictures created after the shoot (some images I have just stared at for ages and ages).'

Miss Diamond Sparkle
Miss Diamond Sparkle shot by DrAC


What is it about an image that gives you the feeling to stare at it for ages?

'Haha, that is a good question. I'm not sure why I do that. I am a bit weird though.'


I think we all have a bit of weirdness if we're honest. Do you find yourself, as lots of us do, doubting your abilities, and the staring is a bit of a "bloody hell, I created that" moment?

'Haha. I think it is more of wow this photographer or artist is so talented. I have been working with some people that are really amazing at what they do.'

Miss Diamond Sparkle
Miss Diamond Sparkle shot by Andy's Photography


In recent months many things have been called in to question. A while ago it was the Formula One grid girls and it's impact on the objectification of women. More recently, Walmart removing Cosmopolitan magazine from it's checkout aisles, with objectification of woman again sited as one of the reasons. Have you found yourself and your modelling subjected to such scrutiny and people passing judgement on it?

'The only judgement I have had is doing nude work. People not in the industry think it is disgusting (as one lady put it to me once)'


She said what to you? What transpired to make her say such a thing?

'I was shooting outside on location nude and she took offence.'


A few things spring to mind. Where were you shooting? How did she happen upon you?

'I cannot remember what town it was but it was along a beach.'


I've spoken to people who were caught by dog walkers, or asked to leave by security, but never someone who had such a negative experience. Did she berate you and leave? Did she threaten to call the authorities? Did she make you leave?

'She called the police and just waited for us to leave.'


Did they show up?

'We were gone before the police turned up, haha.'

Miss Diamond Sparkle
Miss Diamond Sparkle shot by C-Imagery


Within your body of work you have some images which revolve around cinematic themes. Such as some in which you are a zombie, and some of you in a Matrix themed shoot. Is acting something you'd be interested in doing or are you purely interested in photographic but enjoy bringing the cinematic themes to shoots at times?

'I really enjoyed those shoots. The zombie one was probably one of the most fun shoots I had ever done because it was a group shoot and I just took over like I was a zombie. At one point I almost convinced myself I was a zombie getting into the role so much haha. I am not really interested in doing speaking roles. I did try it once but got so nervous I just froze.'

Miss Diamond Sparkle
Miss Diamond Sparkle shot by Rob3


I can relate to the nerves causing you to freeze. There's a reason I stand on the side of the camera I do! Are there any films you'd like to do a photoshoot based on?

'Alice In Wonderland would be amazing, haha. But I would love to do a vampire shoot if any castings come up one day for that.'

Miss Diamond Sparkle
Miss Diamond Sparkle shot by Andy's Photography


You are, by your own admission, "always changing the length of my hair and colour". Have there been any instances where you've got it done thinking this'll be awesome for shoots, then as soon as it was finished found yourself thinking, oh hell no? Or are there any you now look back on with hindsight and wonder what you were thinking?

'I got my hair done quite a few times because I didn't want people to get bored of me. Everyone keeps telling me to keep my hair long now so probably wont change the length.'

Miss Diamond Sparkle
Miss Diamond Sparkle shot by C-Imagery


Whilst I was preparing these questions I happened to stumble across this video (https://www.instagram.com/p/Bd8N5nSFB_D).

'HAHA., oh the karaoke. I keep being told I cannot sing but I just enjoy it so much. I managed to clear the whole pub once!'

Miss Diamond Sparkle
Miss Diamond Sparkle shot by Rob3


Is Shania Twain's Man! I Feel Like A Woman your usual go to karaoke hit and/or do you have others?

'My karaoke songs are I Love Rock n Roll, These Boots Are Made For Walking and Hey Big Spender, haha.'

Miss Diamond Sparkle
Miss Diamond Sparkle shot by C-Imagery


If people want to see more of your work, or book a shoot with you, where should they visit?

'PurplePort is the best way to contact me. I have been on a lot of other hosting sites but I have found it one the best to be honest.'

Miss Diamond Sparkle
Miss Diamond Sparkle shot by DrAC


Lastly...and no pressure but I have heard you're funny...what's your favourite joke?

'I have been told that I am naturally really funny but when I try to be funny I am not. So I am not going to tell you any jokes right now, sorry!'



I'd like to thank Miss Diamond Sparkle again for taking the time to answer a few questions for me. Be sure to check out all the links above for more of Miss Diamond Sparkle's work, as well as the links attached to the images for the other creatives involved in creating them.

Ian
https://facebook.com/guffoggthegeek
https://twitter.com/guffoggthegeek

Wednesday, 4 April 2018

Guffogg's Guest - Taz Rahman

Welcome to 'Guffogg's Guest',  the series in which I interview creatives about their journey into the creative world, their works, and what makes them tick. This week I'm interviewing London & Cardiff wedding & event photographer, Taz Rahman of Weddings By Taz.

wedding photo by Taz Rahman, Cardiff wedding photographer
Wedding of Rhi & Andrew by Taz Rahman, Cardiff wedding photographer


Hi Taz. Thank you for taking a little time out of your day to answer some questions for me. How did you come to find yourself wielding a camera?

'It wasn’t love at first sight but merely a child’s curiosity. My late father was into photography in his younger days. As a child, I used to play with a slightly cracked black Bakelite Kodak camera that was his first camera as a teenager in the late 1950s. I used to open up the back, wind the white winding knob on the top incessantly and press the shutter button pretending I was taking the black and white photos I had seen in family albums. By this time, my middle-aged father was still sporting an ancient but shiny Yashica 635 TLR camera, which he bought in Beirut, Lebanon as a student in the 1960s. My father shot 35mm colour slides using a special adapter and I still recall the mysterious process that required him to take the camera under a blanket with the room curtains drawn to load the films! By the start of the 1980s, our household welcomed a Konica c35. I was still too young and unstable to demand holding it, but it fascinated me and the tack sharp photos of my father’s travels into distant lands like China, Russia, Venezuela and communist era Hungary got me hooked on the stories he would recount to go with the glossy 6x4 prints.   

My first camera was a Hanimex point and shoot bought in 1990 from Argos funded through my paper-round income. A menacing looking black Miranda SLR like the one owned by my best friend was beyond my means. His black and white photos for the school magazine were so droolingly moody. I bought my first proper digital camera, a Canon s30 with full manual controls back in 2001. It was so thrilling to see instantly what I was snapping away. But, I still wasn’t seriously interested in photography until 2006, when I found myself having four weeks of convalescence after a hernia operation. On a whim, I bid on and won an Olympus OM40 SLR and spent the subsequent weeks reading exhaustively every online article I could find on film photography. That was my first serious foray into photography. For the next decade I bought more vintage cameras and must have shot at least 20 rolls of film each year. Admittedly, a lot of the photos were of my cat or some foliage along routes I regularly cycled through, so not particularly interesting. I bought my first DSLR camera in 2009 and turned professional in late 2014.'

wedding photo by Taz Rahman, Cardiff wedding photographer
Lilly & Bunny by Taz Rahman, Cardiff wedding photographer


The Yashica 635 is actually on my very, very extensive camera wish list. If I may, what saw your father travelling to such interesting lands? Please say spy! Please say spy!

'He worked in the civil and diplomatic services, nothing so exotic like a spy. The photos he took in exotic countries (they were still exotic in the 70s and 80s) were just photos of his associates and colleagues but often with stunning backdrops like the Great Wall in China. The stories from those travels and what I was seeing in the 6x4 prints – I remember waiting avidly for the prints to come back from the printers – they were just fascinating.'

wedding photo by Taz Rahman, Cardiff wedding photographer
Wedding of Tasha & Christopher by Taz Rahman, Cardiff wedding photographer


I understand your main source of income is wedding photography. What made you go down this route?

'Yes, I am a wedding photographer and I absolutely love photographing weddings!

While at university, I was working part-time for one of the largest high street fashion retailers in Cardiff. I eventually ended up as the head of staff training and recruitment at the local branch. You can’t be so submerged in fashion and latest trends, and not get excited by it. Fashion felt glamorous and I was also finding myself obsessing over the fashion oriented photography of visionary masters like Paolo Roversi, Sarah Moon and the more contemporary Emily Soto. I started shooting a few events and even a couple of store-held catwalks. Again, on a whim, I decided to pack in the day job and become a full-time professional photographer. Although with hindsight, I now realise that I should have made a gradual transition into full-time photography. At the time, the photography I was engaged in professionally was not even close to the works of Roversi, Moon and Soto. I was making a living out of corporate and family event photography and the odd portrait session. I did not know how I could acquire the skills and explore my visions of fashion photography, and most importantly, earn a living from it.

I had photographed a couple of weddings for friends in 2013 and 2014 for free and eventually I found myself photographing weddings for money. As I acquired the skills and became confident in my ability to create a personal style of work, it was at weddings and in particular the bridal portrait sessions that I finally found the opportunity to truly act out my fashion photography obsessions. The colourful visions of femininity tingled with the magic of romance was my calling card and that is how I fell in love with weddings, and eventually became a fine art wedding photographer.'

wedding photo by Taz Rahman, Cardiff wedding photographer
Wedding of Bronte & Sam by Taz Rahman, Cardiff wedding photographer


People sometimes struggle with knowing when, and how to make that transition from shooting weddings for free to charging for their services. What advice would you give?

'That decision should be made for you. Start charging when you need to make money out of photographing weddings and that is what happened in my case. Whether that earning is one’s sole income or to drive a hobbyist’s passion does not matter. I photographed three free weddings and looking back, had I charged, the quality of those weddings, especially the first two would have embarrassed me!

Here’s the thing, wedding photography today is about capturing moments. Nobody does traditional wedding photography anymore other than a few oldtimers who have been in the business for 20 years or more, or perhaps those who have just started out and don’t know which moments to capture, and don’t know what the brides want. Every other experienced professional who started out with weddings in the DSLR era falls into the two other categories - documentary/photojournalism or fashion/contemporary weddings. Both of these styles are about the important moments, the difference between the styles is that some photographers just capture the moments as they happen and others like to engineer the moments to some extent.

So ideally, you can start charging as soon as you learn about which moments to capture. There are countless wedding blogs that should serve as a guide, some of the most popular being:

https://www.rockmywedding.co.uk
https://www.rocknrollbride.com
http://bridesupnorth.com
https://junebugweddings.com
https://www.stylemepretty.com

Look through the blogs, note the styles of photography and one is already in a better place to shoot a wedding! In practise, it is a little more complicated as no two weddings are the same and having that relaxed wedding photography experience one can get at a friend or relative’s wedding is invaluable.

Second-shooting is another way of getting that experience but if I am honest there are very few opportunities for paid second-shooting unless you are already an experienced wedding photographer. No matter how good your portrait work is and however many salon competitions you have won with your fantasy themed portraits, you can’t just turn up to a wedding with no experience of photographing weddings and expect to turn out photos that can be seen in the blogs above.You just won’t be up to speed despite all your existing technical knowledge. You might not like the highlight crushing, missed focus, green cast over some of these blog photos, but that is what the brides want. You will not get a premium wedding booking by showing off your Purpleport.com FPI photos because the brides know what they want in the age of pinterest and instagram!

This is a shameless plug, I have written a guide to wedding photography which is actually aimed at brides and grooms, but it comprehensively covers the styles of photography, what to expect and costs, and so it is a useful read for anybody thinking about embarking on wedding photography as a career – ‘How to choose your ideal wedding photographer: a concise wedding photography guide for brides and grooms!’ (https://www.amonochromedream.com/wedding-photography-styles-cardiff)

There is also a burgeoning Wedding Photography related forum within Purpleport for those readers who are members of the site: https://purpleport.com/group/wedding-photography'

wedding photo by Taz Rahman, Cardiff wedding photographer
Channelle by Taz Rahman, Cardiff wedding photographer. Make-up & hair styling also by Channelle


Admittedly, I personally have only seen this from people who have only shot one or two, but, wedding photography has a bit of a reputation for been very stressful, and a lot of hard work. Is this the case?

'Any genre of professional photography can be stressful because you are working for someone and have a deadline to meet. Wedding photography is no different. However, the fact that you potentially have more variables to go wrong during the day because you are not in charge of every aspect of planning the day as you can be at a studio shoot, or even for that matter other event shoots. This is where, skill, experience and an easygoing nature truly helps. Initially or at least until I had found the confidence to create my own style of work, there was that stress of the unknown. However, now that the brides and grooms booking me come to me for my personal style of photography rather than just booking any old photographer to document their special day, I find myself more at ease. I can take the time to capture just the right moments and create a set of photos in a style that is truly associated with me rather than having to work through a shot-list.'

wedding photo by Taz Rahman, Cardiff wedding photographer
Wedding of Natalie & Adam by Taz Rahman, Cardiff wedding photographer


As well as weddings you shoot events. With weddings and events, unlike most other photographic genres, you can't really re-shoot some time later. It's very much a one chance thing. Is it intentional that you shoot such pressure laden subjects? Do you find you work better with such pressure? Or is it purely coincidental and you just happen to enjoy the subject matter?

'That is a great question! I actually rather enjoy the bustle of the wedding, I absolutely love the moments I get to spend with the couple, I love the bridal prep and the evening’s shenanigans. But here is my guilty secret, I actually love photographing any event that has a dancefloor and people strutting their stuff! Yes, you can’t recreate any of these moments, but with confidence in your own technical ability comes the knowledge that what you are capturing is going to be seen as 'magic moments' by each client. I guess, the confidence comes from knowing about those perfect moments and working hard to give oneself as a photographer as much chance of capturing these moments by being in the right place, and with the most appropriate camera settings! Lastly, as I increasingly get booked for my style of work, whether it is weddings, corporate parties or even the odd 21st birthdays at prestige venues, I sort of glibly know that I won’t miss the shot, whatever that shot might be!'

wedding photo by Taz Rahman, Cardiff wedding photographer
Danni & Ryan couples shoot by Taz Rahman, Cardiff wedding photographer


I know you said earlier about not working through a shot list, but, do you generally have ideas in your head, for example where you're going to shoot from, or are you very much reactive to the events of the wedding as they unfold?

'I know my style of work so I aim to visit a venue that I have not photographed before or at least do some research. I also make a note of everything the bride and groom has discussed with me with regards to their theme and plan for the day. That plan is my guide and I add shape to this guide by relying on my personal style of documenting the event, and lastly by reacting to the conditions on the day. My personal style is actually a mixture of reportage and adding a fine art twist to it. I love using sub-frames in my work and effective use of this allow for a very distinctive style as well as creating a personal presence for the photographer (see image: https://tinyurl.com/y9u55pyc)'

wedding photo by Taz Rahman, Cardiff wedding photographer
Wedding of Tasha & Christopher by Taz Rahman, Cardiff wedding photographer


I believe you've had your work featured in various publications, and had it exhibited. When people take up photography, the hope sometimes is getting features and exhibitions. The trouble is, they often don't know how this happens. How did these things come about for you?

'Publication was never really my goal but there can be huge personal satisfaction from seeing one’s work in print. My publications are all photojournalism or event related. In my case, to get to know the local community as well as improve my storytelling photojournalistic skills, as soon as I turned professional in 2014, I started covering local political and community events. Between 2015 and 2016 I must have covered at least 50 local political protests, although this came down to merely a dozen in 2017 because I was so busy elsewhere. These photos were filed with Alamy News stock photo site (http://www.alamy.com/search/imageresults.aspx?pseudoid=%7b169325CC-55EA-43F7-BBD1-EA69FEB2056D%7d&name=Taz+Rahman&st=11&mode=0&comp=1www.alamy.com) as well as local media outlets. So I soon found a photo of mine gracing the front page of the Daily Mail! Since then, I’ve also had quite a few photos being published in other national, international and local publications. Sometimes, being the only photographer at a small but significant local rally does boost the chance of being published as a photojournalist.

In terms of exhibitions, both of mine had been group exhibitions with works by other artists curated as part of the same theme. There is some vanity in this statement, I’d love to be in a position in ten years time to have a one man bridal portrait exhibition, although, I fear that I might be the only person attending!'

wedding photo by Taz Rahman, Cardiff wedding photographer
Annabella by Taz Rahman, Cardiff wedding photographer


We can't really talk about the publishing of your work without me asking, what would be your dream publication to see your work in, or on the cover of?

'For photojournalism related publication, while this is not an ambition but I would love to see a few more front pages of national newspapers. This is unlikely to happen as I am photographing fewer political rallies these days!

I really have no ‘major magazine’ publication related ambition for my portrait or wedding work. The style shoots and creative portraits I work on in between weddings and events just feed my passion for creativity and allow me to test out techniques that I could later implement at a wedding. But saying that, I do love the concept of photo essays and the photographic telling of stories. Three such publications that I absolutely love are Steven Shore’s iconic colour masterpiece ‘Uncommon Places’ (https://aperture.org/shop/shore-uncommon-places-revised-book/), Tim Walker’s accompanying book to his stunning 2012 Somerset House exhibition ‘Story Teller’ (https://www.timwalkerphotography.com/books/story-teller) and a slightly less iconic publication but one that had a lot of influence in my early work, Jason Bell’s ‘An Englishman in New York’ (http://www.jasonbellphoto.com/published-books/englishman-new-york/). They are all so very different and stand out for different reasons, but the common strand is that the photographer saw something utterly unique in the subject matter, documented that vision into photos and finally curated a collection. I don’t see it happening, but one day I’d perhaps like to work on such a project of my own choosing.'

wedding photo by Taz Rahman, Cardiff wedding photographer
Wedding of Rhi & Andrew by Taz Rahman, Cardiff wedding photographer


If people would like to see more of your work, or book your services, where should they head?

'My website for weddings, events and lifestyle portraits is www.amonochromedream.com and I also tend to share some of personal favourite photos within instagram: https://www.instagram.com/amonochromedream'

wedding photo by Taz Rahman, Cardiff wedding photographer
India Rose by Taz Rahman, Cardiff wedding photographer


Finally, what's your favourite joke?

'I am terrible with jokes, I just don’t have the comic timing, so I’d probably ruin the best line by making it the least funniest!'

wedding photo by Taz Rahman, Cardiff wedding photographer
Wedding of Bronte & Sam by Taz Rahman, Cardiff wedding photographer


I'd like to thank Taz again for taking the time to answer a few questions for me. Be sure to check out all the links above for more of Taz's work, as well as the links attached to the images for the other creatives involved in creating them.

Ian
https://facebook.com/guffoggthegeek
https://twitter.com/guffoggthegeek

Wednesday, 28 March 2018

Guffogg's Guest - Chloesul

Welcome to 'Guffogg's Guest'. The series in which I interview creatives about their journey into the creative world, their works, and what makes them tick. This week I'm interviewing Gosport based model, Chloesul.

Photography by Quality Pixels
Photographer - Quality Pixels


Hi Chloesul. Thank you for taking a little time to answer some questions for me. How is it you found yourself in the modelling world?

'Hello Ian thank you for taking the time to talk to me.

How I found myself in the modelling world. It all started by one of my friends studying photography at university. He had asked me to model for him as part of his work and as modelling is something that I have always been interested in doing I thought why not, I'll give it a go, and I dived right in. After the shoot I got the pictures back and couldn’t believe in the shoot I had changed into such a confident person who is not like me at all. Then from there I put a few pictures up on my Facebook page and was bombarded with messages from photographers wanting to shoot with me. I then booked my first shoot and in that shoot we got talking about PurplePort and how to break into modelling.

So I set up a profile and it went crazy from there!'

Photography by Shaun Lloyd
Photographer - Shaun Lloyd


I've heard about the confidence thing with actors. Actors that are shy timid things completely change when a camera is on them. So it happens within modelling too?

'Yes it does happen in modelling. Photographers tend to use the phrase “you're like a meerkat”. I will be having a conversation and a laugh with the photographer but as soon as they point the camera I stop, I pose and I bring confidence.'

Photography by Straker
Photographer - Straker


I believe modelling isn't your full time job. When you're not modelling what's your 9-5?

'Yes you're right, modelling is not my full time job. When I’m not modelling I am now fully qualified as a level 2 child nurse practitioner.

I am currently studying my level 3 in the hospitals. Which is all good fun!'


Please forgive my ignorance, but what's the difference between the different nurse practitioner levels?

'So with nursing and anything to do with children it all goes by what you want to be specialised in. I want to be a paediatric nurse so this means I will be out on the wards dealing with A&E children which is challenging and exciting at the same time.'

Photography by dasphotouk
Photographer - dasphotouk


As a photographer we generally photograph things because we find the subject matter interesting, and/or visually appealing in some way. As a model, how did you choose the levels, and styles that you work?

'When I first started modelling I only ever started doing fashion, and then once working with the same photographer for a couple months I found myself saving Pinterest ideas for shoots which was lingerie and nude. So a month came and went and I had thought about doing nude and lingerie for a while. I did my first lingerie and nude shoot and noticed how much more confident I am and how much expression and shapes I put into my art nude and I just found myself booking up art nude shoots and I haven’t looked back since. It’s still very much my favourite genre. I did try all styles, fashion, topless, lingerie but my biggest passion was the art nude.'

Photography by Steve White Photography
Photographer - Steve White Photography


What do you think it is about a nude shoot that gives you more confidence than say a fashion shoot?

'When it comes to posing nude I have trillions of thoughts going through my brain, so I think about the shape I can get my body into, the expression that suits the theme and I think it gives me confidence because I am showing off that I am a strong confident women with a dance background so my body is always being pushed to new levels.

I’m not saying I don’t enjoy fashion. I think fashion is good but after a while I find myself a bit stuck on new ideas for it and how I can make it different and look good.'

Photography by Steve White Photography
Photographer - Steve White Photography


Last year on your Instagram you posted an update about having issues with self image and self acceptance. I think, if we're honest, we can all relate to what you posted. Have things improved for you since then?

'So last year I dug myself a hole, filled with not eating a healthy diet, not taking care of myself properly anything from hygiene to my food. I have always suffered with an eating disorder which impacted the way I looked at myself. I would always second guess myself and compare myself and it was so unhealthy.

One morning I woke up and said to myself why am I doing this to myself?

That day I registered to a gym, got a new healthy diet plan and fitness goals set, and from then I haven’t looked back. I am at the gym 3/4 times a week, doing dance class and doing everything I can to remain fit and healthy. My happiness has so much improved since changing my lifestyle, I feel healthier in myself and I am a lot more confident when looking in the mirror.'

Photography by Steve White Photography
Photographer - Steve White Photography


Have you found people struggle to understand your body confidence issues, especially with how comfortable you are in front of the camera?

'Now that’s a really good question. Yes, every time people know about me modelling I always get “you must be confident to do that for a camera” and having to tell them I am actually someone who suffers with body and confidence issues. The amount of people who have laughed and said I must be joking is crazy.

Just because I pose in front of a camera doesn’t mean I’m so confident. I refer to my modelling side as a confident, strong and determined person, where as my normal self is a more shy, anxious person who struggles to hold a conversation with anyone new.'

Photography by Frankinsella
Photographer - Frankinsella


Has modelling helped your confidence in your normal self improve?

'Yes, absolutely, modelling has made me very confident as a person. I put myself out there more, have more confidence and believe in myself more.'

Photography by Steve White Photography
Photographer - Steve White Photography


Let's lighten things up a bit. Some of your work has seen you nude outdoors. Have you ever found yourself having to dive behind a tree or under a bush to avoid tourists and dog walkers?

'Ah that’s a question I get asked a bit! And strangely enough...I have never been caught by a dog walker. I don’t know if that’s because I am always up in a tree, in the water, or just because I’m that small people miss me!!'

Photography by Carl Grim
Photographer - Carl Grim


Been up trees, in water and the like can be potentially hazardous. Have you found yourself having any mishaps?

'I had a scare once! I was up a tree for art nude, freezing temperatures and just as I was about to go in to one of my ballet poses I heard a crack from the tree branch and I don’t think I’ve ever had my heart in my throat like that before. Thankfully it was a case of jump onto the ladder quickly and carefully.'

Photography by Quality Pixels
Photographer - Quality Pixels


A little self serving as I'm looking for new stuff to watch, but... Your portfolio notes say you're willing to travel, so, if you're on a long journey to a shoot and you watched a film to pass the time, what film would you choose?

'If I am on a long journey I tend to watch a box series anything along the lines of murder and serial killers I absolutely love! But my favourite film has got to be “Legend” it’s about the Kray twins.'

Photography by Frankinsella
Photographer - Frankinsella


If people want to see more of your work, or book a shoot with you, where should they visit?

'If people want to see more of my work then I book shoots on PurplePort as I am very careful with who I work with.'

Photography by Shaun Lloyd
Photographer - Shaun Lloyd


Lastly, what's your favourite joke?

'My favourite joke is...
Why is Peter Pan always flying?
He neverlands'


I'd like to thank Chloesul again for taking the time to answer a few questions for me. Be sure to check out all the links above for more of Chloesul's work, as well as the links attached to the images for the other creatives involved in creating them.

Ian
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